7 Badminton Net Shot Drills: To Improve Your Net Shot

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7 net shot drills to improve your net shot

Net shots are wonderfully skillful and delicate shots that can really help to improve your game. A net shot is a soft shot which is played underarm from front of the court, near the net, and lands on the opponent’s side of the court, as close to the net as possible. They are an offensive shot that can be an outright winner, but more often create opportunities to attack by forcing your opponent to lift.

There are four main types of net shots, a basic net shot, a tumbling or spinning net shot, a cross court net shot and a hairpin net shot, and each one can be played in a variety of ways. For a more indepth look at badminton net shots and everything you need to know about them, have a read of our article, Badminton Net Shot: Types of Net Shots and How to Play Them.

In this article we have given you 7 different Badminton Net Shot Drills that you can use to improve your net shot. We have broken them down into different levels so that you can use these drills no matter whether you are an experienced player or playing a net shot for the first time.

List of Routines

  1. Multi-shuttle Net Shot Drill (Feeder Drill)

  2. Drop-Net-Net-Lift (Pair Drill)

  3. Net Cord Challenge (Feeder Drill)

  4. Net Battle (Pair Exercise)

  5. Hairpin Net Shot Drill (Feeder Drill) (Hard)

  6. Footwork (Solo Drill)

  7. Shadow Badminton (Solo Drill)

The Net Shot Routines

Multi-shuttle Net Shot Drill
(Feeder Drill)

The Multi-shuttle Net Shot routine is a good drill to practice the net shot motion.

For this drill, one player feeds (throws the shuttle over the net by hand) to the other player and they play a net shot back over the net. This can be done on both sides of the net to work both the forehand net shot and backhand net shot.

We have broken down the drill into different levels of complexity to work different aspects of your net shots. If you are learning how to play a net shot for the first time, work through the levels, if you already know how to play a net shot then jump in wherever you want.

Level 1

Player A stands in one position and plays a net shot to one place. Level 1 is good for practicing the net shot motion. 

Play 3 x 20 shuttles for 1 round and then swap with your partner. Repeat the routine for 3 rounds each.

Level 2

This level adds in movement to your net shot. Instead of standing in one position, this time you  should move back to the middle of the court. Stand in the ready position and as the feeder starts to throw the shuttle over, move forward to play the shot. Move back to the center of the court immediately after playing the shot, by pushing back with your front leg. The feeder should still throw the shuttle to just one corner. 

Play 3 x 20 shuttles for 1 round and then swap with your partner. Repeat the routine for 3 rounds each.

Level 3

This time the feeder should alternate which corner they play the shuttle to. Let’s really start to feel that burn!

Play 3 x 20 shuttles for 1 round and then swap with your partner. Repeat the routine for 3 rounds each.

Level 4

Very similar to Level 3, except now the feeder can play a throw the shuttle to any side they choose. At this level, the player never knows where it is going to go. Level 4 is good for adding movement into the net shot with the unpredictability of which side it is going to go to.

Play 3 x 20 shuttles for 1 round and then swap with your partner. Repeat the routine for 3 rounds each.

The Multi-shuttle Net Shot Drill can be used to practice any and all of the net shot types, both as a forehand or a backhand.

Drop-Net-Net-Lift
(Pair Drill)

The Drop-Net-Net-Lift is a good drill to practice your net shot with full court movement.

To perform the Drop-Net routine, Player A1 begins by lifting to the back of Player 2’s court. Player 2 then plays a drop back to Player 1, who then plays a net shot back. Player 2, after recovering from the drop shot, plays a net shot from Player 1’s net shot. Player 1 then lifts the shuttle to the back of the court for Player 2 to play a drop shot. The routine repeats like this.

We have broken the Drill down into 3 levels for you to work through.

Level 1

Perform this level in only half of the court.

Set a timer for 5 mins and then swap with your partner. Repeat the routine for 3 rounds each.

Level 2

Move up to the full size of the court for the person working. The player feeding should pick a side and the player working should play the drop shot and net shot back to them. The lift can be played anywhere. This level is good for working full court movement.

Set a timer for 5 mins and then swap with your partner. Repeat the routine for each side.

Level 3

Beat the feeder. Instead of playing it back to the feeder, Player A can play the drop and net shot wherever they like to try and beat the feeder. The feeder can still play the lift and net shot anywhere. But feeder, it’s Beat the Feeder, not make it impossible for the worker. Be hard but fair. 

Play to 11 points then swap. Play it like a game with a point for every rally. The net player can kill the shuttle if the drop is way too high over the net. But, net player, let’s not be too harsh.

The Drop-Net-Net-Lift drill can be used to practice any and all of the net shot types, both as a forehand or a backhand.

Want even more Net Shot Drills?

Check them out here

Net Cord Challenge (Feeder Drill)

After you have mastered playing a basic net shot, the next step to the perfect net shot is when you hit the net cord. For those of you who are unsure, the net cord is the string that runs from post to post that is holding the net up. If you manage to hit this, then often the shuttle will tumble down the otherside of the net as a winner. You may think that when professionals manage to hit a net shot net cord that it was just luck, but no they actually practice and aim for this. 

For this drill the feeder will throw shuttles over the net to the player working and they will play a net shot back, aiming to hit the net cord. How many can you hit?

The feeder should play 10 shuttle and then swap with your partner. Repeat this three times each for a best of three game!

The Net Shot Challenge can be practiced using both for a forehand and a backhand net shots.

Net Battle
(Pair Exercise)

The aim of the game is simple, net shots only! One player serves and from then on both players can only play net shots. This is a fantastic way to practice all of the varieties of net shots and learn to get them as tight as possible. 

Hairpin Net Shot Drill (Feeder drill) (Hard)

A difficult drill for more advanced players. The Hairpin Net Shot drill practices returning the shuttle when you are late to the shuttle and it has dropped low towards the ground. The working player will practice getting the shuttle quickly and playing a hard shot under pressure.

For this drill, the feeder will stand on the same side of the net as the working player, in the center of the forecourt with their back to the net. They will hold one shuttle in each hand. The working player will stand in the center of the court with their back to the feeder, facing the back of the court. On the feeder command the player will spin round, perform a split step and try to get the shuttle that the feeder has thrown. The feeder will motion to throw both shuttles at the same time, one to each corner, as the player turns around. Crucially however, the feeder should only release one. The player must have fast reactions to see which shuttle to go for and then play a hairpin net shot over the net.

Play 3 x 10 shuttles for 1 round and then swap with your partner. Repeat the routine for 3 rounds each.

Footwork
(Solo Drill)

Not just good for practicing your net shot, as anytime you are working on your badminton footwork, you’re improving every area of the game from helping you reach the shuttle quicker to returning to the middle of the court faster.

One way to practice footwork is the badminton court clock.

Move to each point around the court using good badminton movement. If you have a partner, they can point to where they want you to move to. If not, just decide for yourself. This drill can be performed with or without your racket.

Perform movement for 5 continuous rounds. 1 round is 1 min on, 30 seconds off.

Shadow Badminton
(Solo Drill)

Practice the net shot movement. Focus on the footwork as well as the net shot motion. If you can, try and move around the court in a way that would reflect a real match. 

I.e. if you play a net shot, your opponent might then play a lift. So move to the back of the court after shadowing the net shot. The more realistic the better.

Perform movement for 5 continuous rounds. 1 round is 1 min on, 30 seconds off.

Conclusion

In conclusion, practicing different badminton net shot drills can help you improve your net shot. These seven drills are a great place to start, but don’t be afraid to experiment and find the drills that work best for you. Remember to have fun and keep practicing!

Want out Compete Collection of
Badminton Drills and Routines

Check them out here

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